… and some more photos

Let’s see. I’ll try to post a few more photos before we’re nomads again. 

We have been able to do a little bit of wildcrafting. In the spring we searched for morels for the first time. I didn’t find any, but Tony did!

Tony with one of his found morels.

Tony with one of his found morels.

 

I have been picking huckleberries for many years in all of my summers working in the Rocky Mountains but I have never seen a berry season like this one! We have been able to pick GALLONS of huckleberries in our free time. Absolutely wonderful! 

Nothing like montana huckleberries!

Nothing like montana huckleberries!

Huckleberries are delicious fresh, frozen, or in a pie.

Huckleberries are delicious fresh, frozen, or in a pie.

We have also been nibbling on thimbleberries, another of our favorites: 

We think thimbleberries taste like yogurt. Yum.

We think thimbleberries taste like yogurt. Yum.

In May and June we spent a lot of time felling, skidding, and peeling logs in preparation for the building of the second WOFATI, a log cabin that uses annualized thermal inertia, and is partially buried with earth. The idea is that one would not have to heat the home in winter, or cool the home in summer. 

setting the first posts

setting the first posts

A little further along.

A little further along.

We also learned the basics of blacksmithing with Mark VanderMeer!

Blacksmithing with Mark VanderMeer!

Blacksmithing with Mark VanderMeer!

We also attended a solar workshop here on the farm, and learned quite a bit about living off the grid and setting up our own “solar systems”:

one of the skiddable solar carts.

one of the skiddable solar carts.

Recently I have been spending a lot of time inoculating logs with mushroom dowels. It is a simple, yet very time-consuming process. Each mushroom prefers a certain type of wood (usually either a hardwood or a softwood). We have a lot of Douglas Fir here, so we have been inoculating logs with Chicken of the Woods, and Turkey Tail, both of which do well on Doug Fir. It is best to use a log that is 3-4 feet long and 4-8 inches in diameter, and fairly recently cut. It is important to maintain a moist environment. You then drill 5/16 inch holes all over the log (trying to get at least 50 plugs into each log). After drilling the holes, you pound in the dowels and cover each hole with some hot wax, to keep the moisture in. The logs are stacked log-cabin style in a shady, moist place and after 6 months to 3 years, the logs will become fully inoculated with mycelium and may begin fruiting. I have inoculated close to 40 logs. It is our gift to future tipi inhabitants. 

inoculating logs with dowels

inoculating logs with dowels

And… a few more photos coming soon!

 

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